Further contemplation of viral infection

 

 

Hello! 

Greetings from the sick-bed once again (same sick-bed, different disease) 

Thanks to XVARR, Biscuit, Y-L Hooi and Tarquin Manek for the tunes, and everyone who turned up to have a drink - and defy the rain - at our in-store on Friday. It was fun, and almost worth the hassle +++

Carla and Sanjay took the reins for the Low Company radio show on NTS this week, you can listen back to it here

Check the site for a load of new things not broached below, including marvellous new Stroom, the aforementioned XVARR’s in-demand Serpent Power tape, and a Lolina LP that is actually so good (nah genuinely) that it threw me completely and I ran out of time to adequately sing its praises. Will attempt to do it justice on our Instagram tomorrow, which, if you don't already follow, you should (@lowcompanyrecords). PLUGGGGG!!!!!!

xxx

 

MOSQUITOES
WATER DRIP HOLLOW OUT STONE

EVER/NEVER | LP | £15.99

Malarial shudders of out-rock abstraction from London/SE outfit Mosquitoes, whose name - doubtless familiar to some of you from their previous self-released 7” and single-sided 12” - has really become them: their music being a swarming, insistent, decentralised attack, as mesmerising as it is MALEVOLENT. Dream-dance of the disease-carrying parasites!  Their approach is crafty, their bite is real, and good luck trying to swat the bastards. Not sure if this conceit will stretchy any further...It would be tempting to call their minimal, carefully modulated but bracingly violent outpourings dubwise, but that implies cliches of echo and delay that Mosquitoes don’t adhere to: better to call it spatial, each element positioned carefully and moving deliberately in space, be it deeply submerged guitar distortion, the incessant clang of a radiator, or plosive vocal jibber-jabber that manages to sound simultaneously and primal and deadpan (think Keiji Haino, or Alan Vega babbling in his sleep, or The Shadow Ring’s Tim Goss with all his teeth knocked out). Just what kind of music is this? It certainly makes use of rock instrumentation and ecology, but it is ROCK only in so far as Mars and Onna and Taj Mahal Travellers and Jac Berrocal are ROCK - sharing, as it does, a certain vertical quality with musique concrete, industrial, and the avant-garde fringes of post-punk, while its walking basslines and percussion parts situate it firmly in the realm of (psychotic, internally combusting) JAZZ. Just in terms of rhythm, of repetition, of counterpoint and interplay and whatever-the-fuck-you-call-groove-when-it's-definitely-not-groove, this is the most exciting 12" we've encountered all year, a reminder that liberation from the doldrums comes almost always, inevitably, from the GROUP mind. More prosaically, but just as accurately, Ever/Never, the New York label responsible for putting this thing out, compare Water Drip to the work of US Maple, and there are some affinities - even it's just a close-mic'd noirish intensity - with Nate Young's Regressions series too. Dunno, it’s just the real deal, this record - how rare to encounter a band, in this day age, so absolutely in control of their intent, manifestation, and effect. Highest possible recommendation! One-time pressing of 200. 

 

BÔ'VEL
CHECK 4 U

BE WITH | 12" | £13.99
 

Sublime, highly sought-after (some c**t on Discogs has it listed for £2k) UK street-soul banger from '96 reissued on Be With, backed with a new and irresistible garage mix from Metrodome.) 'Check 4 U''s sultry, poppy, slo-mo and above all soundsystem-bombing Manc blooz sits nicely alongside the very best of Smith & Mighty, Soul II Soul, Martine Girault, and the kind of stuff Kevin Pearce eulogises in his monumental A Cracked Jewel Case. A summer record if ever there was one.

The version which appears here was one of three mixes that occupied the B-side of Bô'vel's self-released 'Coming Back' promo 12". I have no idea who Metrodome is/are, not sure I want to, but their contemporary (in name only) re-rub on the flip channels the sound and sashay of vintage UKG with disconcerting accuracy - there's literally nothing about this production to suggest it was made post-2000, and that's a compliment.

 


OMEGA TRIBE
NO LOVE LOST

Remastered reissue of this idiosyncratic, melancholic peace-punk death-trip, originally released in '83 on Corpus Christi. On this, their one and only album, Omega Tribe are picketing the same displays of government fuckery and asking the same big questions ("What the hell am I fighting for?" etc) as the rest of the Crass mob, but what comes across on No Love Lost is the band's sheer BEWILDERMENT at the state of the world, as opposed to the standard-issue DISDAIN for it. Far more wavy and melodic than their '82 7" Angry SongsNo Love Lost's inner hippie comes bubbling to the surface regularly throughout the LP,  with sweet (maybe?), melodic passages amid the barrage of anarcho-punk rag-dolling - Poison Girls' fury cut with Dan Treacy's disheartened twang. This sincere and disjointed and CONFUSED delivery of their message leaves us with a stark, honest document of self-expression and protest - and one completely immune to imitation. White vinyl with insert. 
 
U.S.O.C.A.
EMANCIPATOR
MUSIQUES ELECTRONIQUES ACTUELLES | LP | £17.99

Industrialised synth-punk/body-horror from '90s Chicago. Taking inspiration from Front 242, Skinny Puppy, early NiN, Lassigue Bendthaus etc, U.S.O.C.A. pedalled a kind of gristly, militaristic aggro-funk that would've been right at home on Wax Trax!, while also, in its more playful moments, anticipating electrocash postmodernists like Soft Pink Truth and Safety Scissors, and modern-day fetishist-purveyors of shut-in, ultra-alienated machine grind like Beau Wanzer and the L.I.E.S. crew. Minimal, metallic and always rhythm-centric, but still DIY and dilapidated as fuck - Latvian emigre Jānis Sils home-recorded this music, using primitive, mass-market synths and samplers, with no computers or sequencing - Emancipator is a caustic, confrontational, and invigoratingly honest document of urban frustration and resistance. Edition of 250 copies. 
Next Post Previous Post